Wednesday, 12 December 2012

FINAL SESSION - 6pm Tonight


Join us this Wednesday, 12 December for the final instalment of UCL's seminar "Reevaluating the Literary Coterie". Our closing lecture will be given by

Professor Helen Hackett (UCL) speaking on: 
‘Re-evaluating sisterhood and female friendship in the manuscript verse miscellany of Constance Aston Fowler’.

Please join us in Foster Court 114 at UCL at 6:00
Kind regards,
Hannah and Will

Thursday, 29 November 2012

MONDAY 3rd December, 6pm Foster Court 239

Dear all,

Join us this MONDAY, 3rd December at 6:00 for UCL's "Reevaluating the Literary Coterie" seminar. This week we're looking at coteries in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century.  
Dr Gregory Dart is a senior lecturer at UCL. His research, both current and prospective, is centrally concerned with Romanticism, the City, and the history and development of the essay form from Montaigne to the modern period. His paper will look at the role of Charles Lamb and Crabb-Robinson on the 'cockney' formations he has examined in his new book Metropolitan Art and Literature 1810-1840: Cockney Adventures (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012).
Will Bowers is a third-year doctoral candidate at UCL, writing a thesis on the subject of Anglo-Italian cultural relations in the British regency, entitled Paradise of Exiles - Radical Anglo-Italianism 1816-1824. His paper will look at one specific coterie which lasted from the French Revolution to the Victorian period, and is entitled:
 'A curious moving scene of all nations and languages’ - Holland House as salon or coterie.  
Join us in Foster Court 239 at UCL and for dinner afterwards.
Kind regards, 
Hannah and Will

Tuesday, 13 November 2012

Early Modern 2 - Wednesday the 14th of November

 Dear all,
Join us this Wednesday, 14 November at 6:00 for UCL's "Reevaluating the Literary Coterie" seminar. This week we're promised a lively debate:
Professor Steven May, is adjunct Professor of English at Emory University, Atlanta, and Senior Research Fellow in the School of English at Sheffield University, where he is principal investigator of a 4-year Arts and Humanities Research Council grant concerned with Renaissance English scribal culture. His books include The Elizabethan Courtier Poets (1991) an edition of Queen Elizabeth I: Selected Works (2004) and Elizabethan Poetry: A Bibliography and First-Line Index of English Verse, 1559-1603 (2004). His research interests center on English Renaissance manuscript culture, the Tudor court, and editing early modern documents. He will be speaking under the title,
Coteries? What Coteries?
Professor Arthur Marotti, is Distinguished Professor of English Emeritus at Wayne State University, where taught from 1970 to 2010. He has also had visiting appointments at The Johns Hopkins University, The University of Michigan, and two Brazilian federal  universities.  He taught courses in early modern English literature and culture and has a special interest in lyric poetry, material textuality (especially poetry in manuscript) and sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English Catholic culture.  He is the author of John Donne, Coterie Poet (1986); Manuscript, Print and the English Renaissance Lyric (1995); and Religious Ideology and Cultural Fantasy: Catholic and Anti-Catholic Discourses in Early Modern England (2005). As well as a number of essay collections as editor and contributor. His current projects include a book coauthored with Steven May, on a 16th century Yorkshire Household Book, tentatively titled "Ink, Stink Bait, Revenge and Queen Elizabeth: The Household Book of John Hanson."
Concentric Literary Circlees: Christ Church, Oxford Poetry, and the Circulation of Manuscript Verse in Jacobean and Carline England 
Join us in Foster Court 130 at UCL and for dinner afterwards.
Kind regards, 
Hannah and Will

Thursday, 25 October 2012

Eighteenth Century Seminar - 31st of October

Dear all,

We are pleased to announce, after a successful start last week, the second seminar of the series - to take place on Wednesday the 31st of October.

Felicity Roberts is a doctoral candidate at King's College London, writing a thesis on Hans Sloane. Her paper is entitled:

Mary Delany (1700-1788) and her membership of the Bluestockings
 
Dr Christine Gerrard, a fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford, has published widely on the eighteenth century coterie around Aaron Hill, and is also interested in the circle surrounding Princess Caroline of Anspach (later Queen Caroline) in the late 1710s. Her paper is entitled:

A Scorpion in the Nest: Sexual Politics and the Hillarian Coterie, 1720-1725.

After the papers there will be half an hour for questions and conversation, at which wine will be provided. This seminar will begin at 18:00, in Room 119 of the Roberts Buliding UCL, this is the same building as last week, but further up the corridor. Attendees should come to the Malet Place entrance of UCL (opposite Waterstones) and enter the first building through the gates on the left. They will reach a security barrier, where they should say that they are attending the seminar, and will be directed to the correct room. If anyone gets lost, or can't find us, give me a call on 07971 887952 and I'll find you.
 
Any questions should be directed to reevaluatingcoteries@gmail.com, and we look forward to seeing you there. 

Best wishes,

Will Bowers
Hannah Crummé





Tuesday, 9 October 2012

17th October - Early Modern 1

We're pleased to announce the titles for the first seminar of the series,

Hannah Crawforth is a lecturer at King's College, London, and has written extensively on Early Modern poetry. Her paper is entitled,

Memorializing the Coterie: Milton, Sidney and the Politics of 'Lycidas'

The second paper will be given by Jennifer Young, a doctoral candidate at King's College, London. She is primarily interested in Early Modern drama, particularly in the field of textual studies. She will be presenting a paper entitled,

Shakespeare and the Fleet Street Syndicate (1630-32)

The seminar will take place from 18:00-19:30 in the Room 110 of the Roberts Building (http://goo.gl/maps/G5yYk). Attendees should come to the Malet Place entrance of UCL (opposite Waterstones) and enter the first building through the gates on the left. They will reach a security barrier, where they should say that they are attending the seminar, and will be directed to the correct room. If anyone gets lost, or can't find us, give me a call on 07971 887952 and I'll find you.

After the papers there will be half an hour for questions and conversation, at which wine will be served. Any questions should be directed to reevaluatingcoteries@gmail.com, and we look forward to seeing you there. 

Best wishes,

Will Bowers
Hannah Crummé

Wednesday, 26 September 2012

CHANGE OF DATE

Due to unforeseen circumstances we have been forced to alter the dates for two of the seminars. Christine Gerrard and Felicity Roberts will now be speaking on the 31st of October. The Romantic Period session, with Gregory Dart and Will Bowers, will now be on the 3rd of December. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

The running order will now be:
 
17th October: Early Modern 1
Hannah Crawforth (KCL) and Jennifer Young (KCL).



31st October: The Eighteenth Century
Christine Gerrard (Oxford) and Felicity Roberts (KCL).

14th November: Early Modern 2
Steve May (Sheffield & Emory) and Arthur F. Marotti (Wayne State).



Monday, 3rd December: The Romantic Period
Gregory Dart (UCL) and Will Bowers (UCL)

12th December: Closing Lecture
Helen Hackett (UCL).
 

Friday, 14 September 2012

October 3rd - The eighteenth century

I'm pleased to announce that the titles have now been submitted for the first seminar of the series.

Felicity Roberts is a doctoral candidate at King's College London, writing a thesis on Hans Sloane. Her paper is entitled:

Mary Delany (1700-1788) and her membership of the Bluestockings
 
Dr Christine Gerrard, a fellow at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford, has published widely on the eighteenth century coterie around Aaron Hill, and is also interested in the circle surrounding Princess Caroline of Anspach (later Queen Caroline) in the late 1710s. Her paper is entitled:

A Scorpion in the Nest: Sexual Politics and the Hillarian Coterie, 1720-1725.

After the papers there will be half an hour for questions and conversation, at which refreshments will be provided. This seminar will begin at 18:00, in Room 130 of Foster court, UCL, (http://goo.gl/maps/7zOZd), but will move in subsequent weeks.  

Any questions should be directed to reevaluatingcoteries@gmail.com, and we look forward to seeing you there. 

Best wishes,

Will Bowers
Hannah Crummé